Robert Klarić

+ Nature - Landscape - Architecture

End of day tranquility
Vintgar Gorge
Bled vs the Reflection
Bled
Reflections of Slovenia III
Old Wooden
Reflections of SLovenia - Novo Mesto
Zagreb
Zagreb
She Rises!
Lego Castle
Reflections of
Under the tree
Hills
Cathedral
Sunset
City Lights
Winter in the Village
The River
Tranquility
Fairy-tale of Lukavec
Old town Samobor
Castle Lukavec
Castle sunset
Zagreb Cathedral
Trakoscan Castle
Ljubljana
Inside the Cathedral
Bled I
Duck tales of Bled
Tranquility
Bled IV
Bled VII
Relaxation
Bled Stories
Bled IX
Wake Up Sunshine
Dinner time
Logar Valey I
Bled X - Fire above Bled
Bled XI
Bled XII
Logar Valley
Lake Bled Sunset
Swan of the Bled
Old Town Varazdin
Bled vs the Sunset
Bled vs the Natural Frame
Bled vs the Sunset II
Old Town Varazdin
Bled
Boat on the lake Bled
Swan of the Bled
Lake Bohinj
Castle Trakoscan
Church Hill
Old town Ozalj
Little Waterfall
Logar Valley
Bled
Bled
Lake Bohinj
Logar Valley
The Gratitude Wall
Bled
Logar Valley
LOgar Valley
Bled
Bled
Plitice Lakes
The Big Sprinkler
Plitvice Lakes
Plitvice Lakes
Plitvice Lakes
Garden of Eden
Plitvice Lakes
Plitvice Lakes
Rastoke
Bled
View from Vogel
Castle Lukavec
Plitvice Lakes
Plitvice Lakes
Plitvice Lakes
Old Chappel
Reflection
Swans Lake
Fall on Plitvice Lakes
Path to a waterfall
Plitvice Lakes
Plitvice lakes
The Chapel
Plitvice lakes
Pathway
Plitvice lakes
Swan on lake Bled
Bled after the sunset
Bled
Bled
Cascades of Plitvice
Down by the river
Red Sky
Chapel vs the Fog
Bled vs the Night
Walkway
Sunset over Zagreb
Waterfalls of Plitvice lakes
Logar Valley
Old chapel
Bled
Pasture
Winter tale of the little Chapel
Clouds vs the Mountain
Bled and duck
Snow day
Trakoscan Castle
Church of st. Martin
Bled
Frozen
Castle Lukavec
Bled and reflection
Trakoscan vs the Winter
Chapel from the air
The Horse in the Hat
TRakoscan castle
Foggy day in Plitvice lakes

End of day tranquility

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Vintgar Gorge

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled vs the Reflection

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Reflections of Slovenia III

Photo was taken in town of Novo Mesto in Slovenia. Edit has been done only in camera raw.

Old Wooden

One of many wooden chapels in Turopolje area in Zagreb County, this one is located in small village of Cerje Pokupsko

Reflections of SLovenia - Novo Mesto

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Zagreb

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Zagreb

She Rises!

Heavy rains that have struck Croatia in the previous three days are now threatening with floods in areas of central Croatia. Preparations are being made for a possible flood wave in the next 24 hours. The radio reported some 1,500 people were under an immediate threat from flooding.

Lego Castle

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Reflections of

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Under the tree

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Hills

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Cathedral

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sunset

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

City Lights

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Winter in the Village

The River

Tranquility

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Fairy-tale of Lukavec

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Old town Samobor

The first fort on this site, on a hill above the intersection of then important routes in the northwestern corner of the Sava valley above the medieval market town of Samobor, was erected by supporters of the Czech king Ottokar II of Bohemia between 1260 and 1264, who was than at war with Hungarian king Stephen V.[2] Croatian-Hungarian forces of knez of Okić near the Samobor soon retook the castle and knez of Okić was granted city of Samobor and also the privilege to collect taxes. It was a stone fortress built on solid rock - in an irregular and indented layout, which consists three parts, of which the central core -is the oldest. In the southeastern part of the core is the high guard tower (today in ruins), the only remaining original part of Ottokar castle. With this tower lies a semicircular tower with a small gothic chapel of St. Ana from the third decade of 16th century. Layout of Samobor Castle In the third decade of the 16th century begins castle reshaping and gradually expanding core to the north - an elongated trapezoidal courtyard surrounded by a strong defensive wall with a pentagonal tower on the battery ends. Through the 17th and 18th century, the castle was upgraded and reconstructed,[3] as the last in the city was built three storey house with its southern side. In its upper part forms a courtyard whose facades with two sides articulated porches with Tuscan columns, and the interior is rich with equipment, so that the castle lost its fortification function and gradually turns into a countryside baroque styled castle. Last residents leave the castle at the end of the 18th century,[2] and then begins to decline from that stone building. Rulers and owners of the Samobor Castle The probable appearance of the Samobor Castle (late 18th century) 3D reconstruction The first known rulers were feudal family Babonić, then with Samobor Castle manages the Hungarian-Croatian kings, and in the 15th century became the property of the Counts of Celje. At the beginning of 15th century Castle comes into possession to feudal family Frankopan. Then the castle changed many owners, Counts; Tržac, Tahy, Auersperg, Kiepach, the last owner of the castle who lived in it were Counts from house Erdödy-Kulmer. Municipality of town Samobor bought the castle in 1902. from last owner Montecuccoli and since then the castle and its surroundings serve as a town resort place.

Castle Lukavec

Castle sunset

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Zagreb Cathedral

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Trakoscan Castle

Trakošćan was built in the 13th century within Croatia's northwestern fortification system, as a rather small observation fortress for monitoring the road from Ptuj to Bednja Valley. According to a legend, Trakošćan was named after another fortification (arx Thacorum) that was alleged to have stood in the same spot back in antiquity. Another source claims that it was named after the knights of Drachenstein who were in control of the region in early Middle Ages. The toponym was first mentioned in written records in 1334. It is not known who its owners were in the first years of its existence. As of the end of the 14th century, it was owned by the Counts of Celje, who were in charge of the entire Zagorje County. The family soon became extinct, and Trakošćan shared the fate of their other burgs and estates that were divided and kept changing owners. In these divisions, Trakošćan was, as a whole, first owned by an army leader by the name of Jan Vitovac, then by Ivaniš Korvin, who gave it to his deputy warden Ivan Gyulay. The family kept the castle throughout three generations, and became extinct in 1566, after which the ownership was taken over by the state. King Maximilian gave the estate to Juraj Drašković (1525–1587) for services rendered, first personally, and then as family heritage. This was how, in 1584, the Drašković family finally came into possession of Trakošćan. In the second half of the 18th century, when the building of manors was flourishing in Hrvatsko Zagorje, Trakošćan was abandoned. Neglected, it fell quickly into dilapidation. It was only towards the middle of the 19th century that the family became interested once again in its estate, in the Romanticist spirit of return to nature and family traditions. In this spirit, the deputy marshal Juraj V. Drašković turned the castle into a residential manor-house, while the surrounding park was turned into Romanticist pleasure grounds. The generations that followed were staying at the castle from time to time all the way until 1944 when they were forced to emigrate to Austria. Soon after that, the castle became nationalized. The Museum with collections on permanent display was established in 1953.[2] The castle is today owned by the Republic of Croatia. The castle itself reveals different phases of building. For several centuries, it used to be a fortification, so that the reconstructions undertaken during that period were functional rather than aesthetic. The facility's essential core is a Romanesque fortification consisting of a housing unit, a small fortified yard, and a massive high tower. The fortification's good location and its observation tower made it safe and easy to defend. Rapid development of firearms and increasingly threatening Turkish attacks made additional construction and further fortifying urgently necessary. The Drašković family's second generation, Ivan II and Petar, added the western tower, which may be seen from the coat-of-arms and the accompanying inscription. On the Great Genealogical Tree, the oldest visual presentation from 1668, the facility had three floors, and its basic dimensions could already be discerned. Over the next period, several defense facilities were added around it. At the time, it also had the highest number of inhabitants, as may be seen from the Small Genealogical Tree dating back to 1755. It was in this same century that the outbuildings were erected at the foothills of Trakošćan, and a stone bridge built over the river Bednja. In the 19th century Trakošćan acquired its present appearance. In the 1840-1862 period, during one among the first restoration undertakings in the country, the castle was reconstructed in Neo-Gothic style. This not only altered its exterior, but also finally brought to an end its five centuries long fortification purpose. The reconstruction also included the appearance of Romanticist pleasure grounds by Juraj V. Drašković, after the model of English parks. When the dam was built, the valley turned into a large lake. The uniqueness of style characterizing the facility equally includes the interior and its surrounding landscape. Count Drašković sold Klenovnik Castle, the largest castle in Croatia, then also held by the Draskovich Family in order to fund the restorations. After the reconstruction, the castle was still inhabited by several generations of the Drašković family that did some additional constructions and adaptations. It was at the time that the northern tower appeared over the entrance, a large shingle cap added to the top of the tower (removed in 1961), and a southwestern vaulted terrace added. The end of World War II found Trakošćan in a neglected and dilapidated condition, which is why protective architectural and interior decoration works were immediately undertaken. Over the past few years, the castle has once again been affected by decay.

Ljubljana

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Inside the Cathedral

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled I

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Duck tales of Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Tranquility

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled IV

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled VII

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Relaxation

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled Stories

Bled IX

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Wake Up Sunshine

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Dinner time

Logar Valey I

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled X - Fire above Bled

Bled XI

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled XII

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Logar Valley

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Lake Bled Sunset

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Swan of the Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Old Town Varazdin

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled vs the Sunset

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled vs the Natural Frame

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled vs the Sunset II

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Old Town Varazdin

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Boat on the lake Bled

Swan of the Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Lake Bohinj

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Castle Trakoscan

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Church Hill

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Old town Ozalj

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Little Waterfall

Logar Valley

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Lake Bohinj

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Logar Valley

The Logar Valley (Slovene: Logarska dolina, Logarjeva dolina[3]) is a valley in the Kamnik Alps, in the Municipality of Solčava, Slovenia. The Slovene name for the valley is of relatively recent coinage[3] and is derived from the Logar farm, which in turn is derived from Log (literally, 'swampy meadow'). In 1987, the valley received protected status as a landscape park encompassing 25 square kilometres (9.7 sq mi)

The Gratitude Wall

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Logar Valley

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

LOgar Valley

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Plitice Lakes

Plitvice Lakes National Park (Croatian: Nacionalni park Plitvička jezera, colloquial Plitvice, pronounced [plîtʋitse]) is one of the oldest national parks in Southeast Europe and the largest national park in Croatia.[2] In 1979, Plitvice Lakes National Park was added to the UNESCO World Heritage register.[3] The national park was founded in 1949 and is situated in the mountainous karst area of central Croatia, at the border to Bosnia and Herzegovina. The important north-south road connection, which passes through the national park area, connects the Croatian inland with the Adriatic coastal region. The protected area extends over 296.85 square kilometres (73,350 acres). About 90% of this area is part of Lika-Senj County, while the remaining 10% is part of Karlovac County. The national park is world famous for its lakes arranged in cascades. Currently, 16 lakes can be seen from the surface.[5] These lakes are a result of the confluence of several small rivers and subterranean karst rivers. The lakes are all interconnected and follow the water flow. They are separated by natural dams of travertine, which is deposited by the action of moss, algae, and bacteria. The particularly sensitive travertine barriers are the result of an interplay between water, air and plants. The encrusted plants and bacteria accumulate on top of each other, forming travertine barriers which grow at the rate of about 1 cm (0.4 in) per year. The sixteen lakes are separated into an upper and lower cluster formed by runoff from the mountains, descending from an altitude of 636 to 503 m (2,087 to 1,650 ft) over a distance of some eight km, aligned in a south-north direction. The lakes collectively cover an area of about two square kilometres (0.77 square miles), with the water exiting from the lowest lake forming the Korana River. The lakes are renowned for their distinctive colors, ranging from azure to green, grey or blue. The colors change constantly depending on the quantity of minerals or organisms in the water and the angle of sunlight. Through different climatic influences and the large difference in elevation within the protected area, a multifaceted flora and fauna has been created. The national park area is home to many endemic species. Those species that prevailed at the lakes before the arrival of man still exist. Each year, more than 1.1 million visitors are recorded. Strict regulations apply.

The Big Sprinkler

Plitvice Lakes National Park (Croatian: Nacionalni park Plitvička jezera, colloquial Plitvice, pronounced [plîtʋitse]) is one of the oldest national parks in Southeast Europe and the largest national park in Croatia.[2] In 1979, Plitvice Lakes National Park was added to the UNESCO World Heritage register.[3] The national park was founded in 1949 and is situated in the mountainous karst area of central Croatia, at the border to Bosnia and Herzegovina. The important north-south road connection, which passes through the national park area, connects the Croatian inland with the Adriatic coastal region. The protected area extends over 296.85 square kilometres (73,350 acres). About 90% of this area is part of Lika-Senj County, while the remaining 10% is part of Karlovac County. The national park is world famous for its lakes arranged in cascades. Currently, 16 lakes can be seen from the surface.[5] These lakes are a result of the confluence of several small rivers and subterranean karst rivers. The lakes are all interconnected and follow the water flow. They are separated by natural dams of travertine, which is deposited by the action of moss, algae, and bacteria. The particularly sensitive travertine barriers are the result of an interplay between water, air and plants. The encrusted plants and bacteria accumulate on top of each other, forming travertine barriers which grow at the rate of about 1 cm (0.4 in) per year. The sixteen lakes are separated into an upper and lower cluster formed by runoff from the mountains, descending from an altitude of 636 to 503 m (2,087 to 1,650 ft) over a distance of some eight km, aligned in a south-north direction. The lakes collectively cover an area of about two square kilometres (0.77 square miles), with the water exiting from the lowest lake forming the Korana River. The lakes are renowned for their distinctive colors, ranging from azure to green, grey or blue. The colors change constantly depending on the quantity of minerals or organisms in the water and the angle of sunlight. Through different climatic influences and the large difference in elevation within the protected area, a multifaceted flora and fauna has been created. The national park area is home to many endemic species. Those species that prevailed at the lakes before the arrival of man still exist. Each year, more than 1.1 million visitors are recorded. Strict regulations apply.

Plitvice Lakes

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Plitvice Lakes

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Plitvice Lakes

Garden of Eden

The national park is world famous for its lakes arranged in cascades. Currently, 16 lakes can be seen from the surface.[5] These lakes are a result of the confluence of several small rivers and subterranean karst rivers. The lakes are all interconnected and follow the water flow. They are separated by natural dams of travertine, which is deposited by the action of moss, algae, and bacteria. The particularly sensitive travertine barriers are the result of an interplay between water, air and plants. The encrusted plants and bacteria accumulate on top of each other, forming travertine barriers which grow at the rate of about 1 cm (0.4 in) per year. The sixteen lakes are separated into an upper and lower cluster formed by runoff from the mountains, descending from an altitude of 636 to 503 m (2,087 to 1,650 ft) over a distance of some eight km, aligned in a south-north direction. The lakes collectively cover an area of about two square kilometres (0.77 square miles), with the water exiting from the lowest lake forming the Korana River. The lakes are renowned for their distinctive colors, ranging from azure to green, grey or blue. The colors change constantly depending on the quantity of minerals or organisms in the water and the angle of sunlight. Through different climatic influences and the large difference in elevation within the protected area, a multifaceted flora and fauna has been created. The national park area is home to many endemic species. Those species that prevailed at the lakes before the arrival of man still exist.

Plitvice Lakes

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Plitvice Lakes

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Rastoke

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

View from Vogel

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Castle Lukavec

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Plitvice Lakes

http://www.np-plitvicka-jezera.hr/

Plitvice Lakes

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Plitvice Lakes

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Old Chappel

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Reflection

Swans Lake

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Fall on Plitvice Lakes

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Path to a waterfall

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Plitvice Lakes

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Plitvice lakes

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Chapel

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Plitvice lakes

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Pathway

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Plitvice lakes

View on the Big waterfall from the entrance side of the park

Swan on lake Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled after the sunset

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Cascades of Plitvice

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Down by the river

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Red Sky

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Chapel vs the Fog

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled vs the Night

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Walkway

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sunset over Zagreb

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Waterfalls of Plitvice lakes

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Logar Valley

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Old chapel

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Pasture

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Winter tale of the little Chapel

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Clouds vs the Mountain

Bled and duck

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Snow day

Trakoscan Castle

Church of st. Martin

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bled

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Frozen

Frozen Trakoscan lake, located in Croatia, famous by beautiful castle on the hill.

Castle Lukavec

Test shot for my new tool, DJI Phantom 3, so I can do some aerial photography.

Bled and reflection

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Trakoscan vs the Winter

Castle Trakošćan's cultural heritage, is protected as a historical entity, which consists of the castle, the building next to the castle, park and forest park with a lake. Today the castle is one of the few facilities in Croatia with preserved its own constitution, historically closely related to the architectural framework and the life of its owners.

Chapel from the air

The Horse in the Hat

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

TRakoscan castle

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Foggy day in Plitvice lakes

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA